Art: Jeff Colson @ Maloney Fine Art – 11/8-12/20

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JEFF COLSON

ROLL UP

November 8 – December 20

Opening reception for the artist:
Saturday, November 8, 6-8 PM

COLSON ROLL UP

Jeff Colson “Roll Up” 2012, carved and painted wood construction, 96 X 120 inches

An exhibition devoted to one monumental artwork and supportive drawings.
“Roll Up,” is a figurative sculpture of carved and painted wood.

This “archetypal suitcase” is presented as a partially opened door of a storage unit replete with everyday items such as file cabinets, an ironing board, lawn chairs, a tire, a stereo receiver, plastic containers, and other durables of consumer culture. Colson notes, “The storage metaphor is an existential conundrum, the half-baked notion that if we get all our things in order we might actually keep living indefinitely. There is a furious futility to this accumulation of ‘stuff,’ the overabundance of questionably essential choices, and thinking these things just might come in handy sometime in the future.”

The artist’s approach is a “memory-based idea with all its distortion,” as constructs of the work are biographical from memory. Individually forged through Colson’s own hand-crafted devises, the elements are carved, cut, sawed, sanded, painted, welded, and molded to replicate a relief of modules customized to fit snuggly within the confines of this manufactured receptacle.

The process is instinctual, immediate, and spontaneous yet expendable. Rather than appropriate an existing object, Colson makes it up as he goes along, choosing to rely on a stream of consciousness methodology, which reveals interpretive flaws that intentionally lack hyper-realistic qualities. “I like working that way,” the artist insists, adding, “there is an expedience to quickly knocking something out, as opposed to relying on what you happen to find.” Colson’s intent is not one of anti-reality, or a statement against ready-made or found objects. Nor is it a defensive gesture in reaction to art market trends or the world in general. His acumen is organic, efficient, and honest.

“Roll Up” is a continuation in a body of work that the artist has been developing for the past decade. Autobiographical in nature, Colsonʼs work is created from memory rather than existing objects and wields material in a way that is both transcendent and humorous. Distortion and inaccuracy play a role, which he refers to as “wobbly logic.”

Jeff Colson grew up near the oil fields just north of Bakersfield, California. His father was a social worker whose do-it-yourself aesthetic, making everything from toys to homemade life jackets, informed Colson’s own identity as a “crackpot tinkerer.” In his sculpture, Colson refers to both that quirky, by-the-seat-of-your-pants decision-making process and Modernism’s purist grid. The sculptures are fabricated from both personal and cultural memory, often without referencing specific objects or images. The resulting forms are familiar, but aren’t real. The ambiguous quality of the “fabricated” object that is real and isn’t “real” registers the distortions of memory on “remembered” images and/or events. Colson’s sculptures are physical documents of remembered reality. The sense of history is also literal as each piece can take months, even years to make.

Jeff Colson graduated from California State College, Bakersfield. His work is in the Collection of Count Giuseppe Panza di Buomo at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles; the Sammlung Rosenkranz Foundation in Wuppertal, Germany; the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California; and in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s permanent collection.

Jeff Colson was recently awarded a 2012 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and a 2015 City of Los Angeles (C.O.L.A.) Fellowship

The artist lives and works in Pasadena, California.

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MALONEY FINE ART
2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420

Art: Tim Hailand @ Maloney Fine Art – 9/13-10/31

TIM HAILAND
A Possible Forest

September 13 – October 31, 2014
Opening reception for the artist: Saturday, September 13, 6-8 PM

Tim Hailand, Dita Von Teese Lipstick Mirror Garden Los Angeles, 2014, Unique archival inkjet print on black and white floral fabric, 44″ X 29″

Although from the outset Tim Hailand’s photographs are visually compelling, their subject matter, while figurative, is not immediately discernable. With scrutiny these images gradually reveal their contents. Large-scale, present day, usually male figures who are shirtless loom through what seem to be a series of generally monochromatic scrims of pastoral patterns nearly always taken from the distant idealized past. The robust photographic realities of the present are perceived in tandem with imaginary woodland scenes peopled by costumed nymphs, dryads, farmers, fishermen, and laundresses.

What in lesser hands might be merely theatrical, or cinematic juxtapositions are instead pictures suffused with vigorous dreamlike visions. Time itself is talking; the thoroughly modern is in present dialogue with art from the past. These conversations, as if overheard or glimpsed in gardens, are not didactic but rather invocations guided by the artist’s intuition and chance as he prints his photographs onto patterned cloth of the kind called toile de Jouy. It began to figure in his work during a residency at Monet’s Giverny where his bedroom was papered with a red and white eighteenth-century toile of pastoral scenes.

Hailand later purchased cloth of this same variety to use as grounds on which to print his photographs. These are often portraits of athletic European men, artists, and performers, made, in a variety of places, but also at Giverny. Cloth was mounted to paper cut to dimensions of a size that could be made to fit through an Epson printer and onto which the digitized portraits were directly printed. On occasion the boundaries of the fabric extends beyond the edges of the photograph so that it frames as well as filters what we see. The opacity of the inks and the patterns they carry both mask as well as frame the photographic imagery. The addition of the colors of the toile is intrinsic to the force of the finished works.

Occasionally unexpected juxtapositions of the pattern of the fabric and the flesh of the models give the illusion that bodies and faces are heavily tattooed in ways that overrun, even overwhelm, actual anatomy, as when the drawing of a branch of a tree drapes down from the nape of a man’s neck and splays out over the top of his chest while another leafy limb runs over his ear and forms a kind of carnival mask on his profile. In another image the mast of a ship and a sail extends from a chin up over a mouth and then up onto the bridge of a nose while smaller boats sail across his temples.

The results of these arcane procedures are splendid, simultaneously subtle and strong. Guided by the artist’s intuition, his restless experimentation, and his relentless editing of the results, a unique body of work has come into being. By utilizing revisions of pastoral idylls from the decorative arts of the past, Hailand has uniquely enriched and enlivened modern heroic portraiture.

The artist lives and works in Los Angeles.

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MALONEY FINE ART
2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420
Inquiries – please call / email: MICHAEL MALONEY 310.570.6420 michael.

Art: Augusto Sandroni – Opening Saturday, 7/12, 6-8pm

AUGUSTO SANDRONI

Electro Wonky Funkadelic

July 12 – August 16

Artist’s reception: Saturday, July 12: 6-8 PM

Wonky

August Sandroni, Wonky, 2014, oil on canvas, 30 X 24 inches

Electro Wonky Funkadelic, an installation of new paintings, drawings and sculpture by Augusto Sandroni, will be on view at Maloney Fine Art from July 12 until 16 August 16, 2014. The artist, who was born in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil in the 1960s, came of age when the Utopianism of tropical Modernism was at its peak, and that, along with the largest carnival in the world, played a creative role in later forming his artistic vision. Seeing himself as a visionary artist who operates as if self-taught, Sandroni intuitively works with mundane, non-traditional processes and materials, such as industrial tape, aluminum foil, cardboard, burlap, found objects, and fabric paints. Not striving to make something too perfect, he makes non-symmetrical forms out of cut pieces of tape that act as a “place holder” for paint impasto, playing with the coincidence or absurdity that something can be made from these materials.

His work – straddling a unique space between Arte Povera, Pattern and Decoration, Minimalism, abstraction, craft and just being “things” has been based on sustained meditation. To look at his daring use of color, texture and wild shapes, it may come as a surprise Augusto Sandroni’s influences are Zen Buddhism (negative/positive space), Arte Povera (simple everyday materials), the Mono-ha Japanese art movement (experiential, ephemeral) and the work of Robert Irwin (seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees). Like the Arte Povera artists before him, Sandroni attempts to break down the ‘dichotomy between art and life’ (Celant: Flash Art, 1967), mainly through the creation of paintings, drawings, installations and sculptures made from everyday materials. These apparently simple, abstract compositions are instantaneous, yet come out of a practice of extreme observation, using spatial construction and wonky, slightly off-kilter geometry as devices of stimuli and optimality to act as a mirror or contrast to, as Sandroni sees it, “the speed, clutter, information confusion and information overload of today’s urban living.”

Augusto Sandroni was born in 1964 in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. He came to New York in the early 80s, where he met artists Keith Haring, Futura 2000 and Jean Michel Basquiat, and participated in the spirit and culture of graffiti art and the lower east side. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts Cum Laude in Painting-Printmaking, at San Diego State University (2011), San Diego, CA and a Masters in Fine Arts at Claremont Graduate University (2014) Claremont, CA.

Electro Wonky Funkadelic is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles.
Sandroni lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

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MALONEY FINE ART

2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420

Inquiries – please call / email: MICHAEL MALONEY 310.570.6420michael@maloneyfineart.com

Art: John Tottenham – Opening Saturday, June 14-July 3 @ Maloney Fine Art

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JOHN TOTTENHAM

The Indifferent Sublime

June 14 – July 3

Reception for the artist: Saturday, June 14, 6-8PM

Selfish

John Tottenham, My Last Spurt, 2014, ink on paper, 10 X 8 inches

After graduating with a degree in Fine Art from London’s worst art school in the mid-80s, John Tottenham moved to the United States and stopped painting. He has resided in this country ever since. After many years of resistance, he finally sold out to the lucrative, fast-paced world of poetry. He is the author of ‘The Inertia Variations,’ an epic cycle on the subject of work-avoidance, indolence, failure and related topics, and ‘Antiepithalamia & Other Poems of Regret and Resentment,’ a sequence of mean-spirited love poems with particular respect paid to the institution of marriage. His acerbically entertaining essays about the art world and life in Los Angeles appear regularly in Artillery magazine. He is also an online aphorist, celebrated for his gnomic and anomic utterances on the worldwide web, and a renowned performer of stand-up poetry.

Tottenham also paints and draws. An old-fashioned pencil and paper/ paint and brushes man – an educated outsider and academic primitive – he has produced hundreds of pen and ink drawings of desolate vernacular scenes, overlaid with darkly humorous text. These will be on display, alongside a piece that revisits his adolescent obsession with the female members of a notorious California cult. These fifty tiny, delicately-wrought portraits (mostly renderings of mugshots), arranged in one frame, are an attempt to recapture the qualities that he found so haunting – and which were responsible for his formative impressions of Los Angeles – as a morbidly romantic youth trapped in the heart of the English countryside.

Over the last few years Tottenham has been exhibiting at galleries in Los Angeles and New York. He has had solo shows at Las Cienegas Projects in November 2010 and at the Rosamund Felsen Gallery in July 2012.

John Tottenham lives and work in Los Angeles.

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MALONEY FINE ART

2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420

Inquiries – please call / email: MICHAEL MALONEY 310.570.6420michael@maloneyfineart.com

Art: Kelley, Pettibon, Ruscha @ Maloney Fine Art

MIKE KELLEY
RAYMOND PETTIBON
ED RUSCHA

May 17 – June 7

Raymond Pettibon, No Title (It Got Big), 1990, Pen and Ink on paper, 14 x 11″

Raymond Pettiboon, No Title (Whatever You Say), 1990, Pen and Ink on paper, 17 1/2 X 11 1/4 inches

MALONEY FINE ART
2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420

Inquiries – please call / email: MICHAEL MALONEY 310.570.6420 michael

Art: Tim Hailand @ Paris Photo – April 25-27

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TIM HAILAND @ PARIS PHOTO April 25-27

TIM HAILAND

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PARIS PHOTO / Paramount Studios

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MALONEY FINE ART
C-2 / New York Street Backlot

April 25 – 27

HAILAND.PF3

TIM HAILAND, DAN VINEYARD VIENNA TORSO (ON BROWN PASTORAL TOILE) 2013, Unique digital print on fabric, 44 X 29 inches

In 2012, Tim Hailand was awarded a residency to live and work at Giverny – Monet’s former home and gardens. The room in which Tim lived was wallpapered in toile de Jouy, a kind of 18th century decorative pattern printed on cotton that depicts pastoral life in independent floating monochrome vignettes. Feeling that all aspects of a given environment are materials to be worked with, Hailand began printing his own inkjet photographic portraits of various sitters directly onto toile de Jouy and other fabrics that he selected.

Embracing theories of chaos and chance – allowing his photographic subjects to interact with the images of the fabric, Tim merges the flat with the three-dimensional without giving visual primacy to either. The works juxtapose the imaginary and the real, melding disparate anatomies and graphic styles in a dreamlike manner. In those instances when the patterns of the fabric continue beyond the boundaries of the modern imagery, the suggestion is that the present is invariably framed by the past. Often, the scale of Hailand’s heroic figures dwarfs those seen from the past. In different ways both are idealized and a dialogue of past and present is established. Hailand’s intentions are informed by philosophical considerations as well as his self-imposed visual imperatives. The work attempts to transcend decorative impulses and engage the viewer with the metaphysical world.

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Inquiries – please call / email: MICHAEL MALONEY 310.570.6420michael@maloneyfineart.com

Art: New Arrivals – Mike Kelley

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MIKE KELLEY

communicate10a

MIKE KELLEY, We Communicate Only Throough Our Shared Dismissal of the Pre-Linguistic, 1995,

Ektacolor photograph, mounted on museum board, Signed, inscribed and dated “Printer’s Proof M. Kelley 1995” on the verso.

This work is a printer’s proof aside from an edition of five, 24 X 29 inches / 25 x 31 inches (framed)

In “We Communicate,” Mike Kelley has created a series of 15 Ektacolor photographs that document various drawings made by Kindergarten students, taught by Kelley in the 1970’s. This work was originally accompanied by a written analysis by Kelley, based on the readings of child art therapy. The series is part of a larger body of work titled, “Missing Time, We Communicate,” which explores physical and psychological abuse manifested through aesthetic reinterpretations.

We Communicate,” explores the general tendency in psychological literature and practice to explain unusual aesthetic traits as by-products of phsychic or physical abuse. The contradictory nature of these texts suggest a significant amount of projection on the part of the analyst. Kelley, however allows art viewers to counter this analysis with their own projected readings of the images. The children’s “unconcious” productions may now be consciously interpreted by viewers to fulfill their own idealogical needs.

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MALONEY FINE ART
2680 South La Cienega Blvd.
(between Venice & Washington)
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 570-6420

www.maloneyfineart.com